No Display, No Boot, No Debug Lights: How to Fix Your New PC Build

Question:

How to troubleshoot a newly built PC with no display/boot and no debug lights?

I have assembled a new PC with the following components:

  • CPU: Ryzen 7 5800X3D
  • MB: ASUS Rog Strix Gaming WiFi II
  • GPU: Nvidia RTX 3060 12GB
  • PSU: Sharkoon SHP 80+ Bronze 600 Watt
  • RAM: Kingston 32GB 3200mhz DDR 4
  • When I connect the GPU to the PCIe slot and the power cables, the CPU and the CPU fan seem to slow down and the PC does not display or boot. There are no debug lights on the motherboard, which makes me suspect that the motherboard is faulty. However, the motherboard was bought from Amazon, it was sealed, none of the pins are bent, the RGB on the motherboard is working and the CPU is detected by the motherboard, as it gets warm when I turn on the PC without the fan and the heatsink.

    I have tried the following troubleshooting steps, but none of them worked:

  • Reseating all the components
  • Updating the BIOS through flashback
  • Booting with one RAM stick
  • Trying another GPU (GTX 1650 super), which also caused the PC to turn off when inserted into the PCIe slot
  • What

could be the cause of this problem and how can I fix it?

Answer:

Building a new PC can be an exciting and rewarding experience, but sometimes things can go wrong and you may encounter issues such as no display or boot. This can be frustrating and confusing, especially if you have no debug lights on your motherboard to indicate the source of the problem. In this article, we will try to help you diagnose and fix this issue by following some simple steps.

Step 1: Check the power supply

The first thing you should do is to make sure that your power supply (PSU) is working properly and providing enough power to your PC components. A faulty or insufficient PSU can cause various problems, such as no display, boot, or debug lights. To check the PSU, you can use a multimeter to measure the voltage output of the different connectors, such as the 24-pin ATX, the 8-pin EPS, and the 6-pin or 8-pin PCIe. You can also use a paperclip to short the green wire and any black wire on the 24-pin ATX connector, which will turn on the PSU without connecting it to the motherboard. If the PSU fan spins and the voltage readings are within the acceptable range, then the PSU is likely fine. If not, you may need to replace the PSU or try another one.

Step 2: Check the motherboard

The next thing you should do is to check the motherboard for any signs of damage or defect. Sometimes, the motherboard can be dead on arrival (DOA) or get damaged during shipping or installation. You should inspect the motherboard for any physical damage, such as cracks, burns, or bent pins. You should also check the BIOS battery, which is a small coin-shaped battery that powers the CMOS memory that stores the BIOS settings. If the battery is dead or loose, it can cause the BIOS to reset or fail to boot. You can try replacing the battery or reseating it in its holder. You should also check the motherboard standoffs, which are metal or plastic spacers that separate the motherboard from the case. If the standoffs are not installed correctly, they can cause a short circuit or prevent the motherboard from making proper contact with the case. You can try removing the motherboard from the case and placing it on a non-conductive surface, such as a cardboard box, and see if it boots.

Step 3: Check the CPU

The CPU is the brain of your PC and it needs to be installed correctly and securely in the motherboard socket. If the CPU is not detected by the motherboard, it can cause no display, boot, or debug lights. You should check the CPU for any damage, such as bent or broken pins, or thermal paste residue. You should also check the CPU cooler, which is the device that cools the CPU and prevents it from overheating. If the CPU cooler is not installed properly or not connected to the motherboard fan header, it can cause the CPU to overheat or throttle. You can try reseating the CPU and the CPU cooler, and applying new thermal paste if needed. You can also try clearing the CMOS, which is a process that resets the BIOS settings to their default values. This can help if the BIOS settings are corrupted or incompatible with the CPU. To clear the CMOS, you can use a jumper or a button on the motherboard, or remove the BIOS battery for a few minutes.

Step 4: Check the RAM

The RAM is the memory of your PC and it needs to be compatible and functional with your motherboard and CPU. If the RAM is faulty or not detected by the motherboard, it can cause no display, boot, or debug lights. You should check the RAM for any damage, such as cracks, burns, or dust. You should also check the RAM slots on the motherboard, which are the connectors where the RAM sticks are inserted. If the RAM slots are dirty or damaged, they can prevent the RAM from making proper contact with the motherboard. You can try cleaning the RAM slots with compressed air or a soft brush. You can also try reseating the RAM sticks, and making sure they are aligned and locked in place. You can also try booting with one RAM stick at a time, and testing each RAM stick and slot individually. This can help you identify if any of the RAM sticks or slots are faulty or incompatible.

Step 5: Check the GPU

The GPU is the graphics card of your PC and it needs to be compatible and functional with your motherboard and PSU. If the GPU is faulty or not detected by the motherboard, it can cause no display, boot, or debug lights. You should check the GPU for any damage, such as cracks, burns, or dust. You should also check the PCIe slot on the motherboard, which is the connector where the GPU is inserted. If the PCIe slot is dirty or damaged, it can prevent the GPU from making proper contact with the motherboard. You can try cleaning the PCIe slot with compressed air or a soft brush. You can also try reseating the GPU, and making sure it is aligned and locked in place. You can also try connecting the GPU to the PSU with the appropriate power cables, and making sure they are not loose or faulty. You can also try using another GPU, or using the integrated graphics of your CPU or motherboard, if available. This can help you identify if the GPU or the PCIe slot is faulty or incompatible.

Conclusion

If you have followed all the steps above and still have no display, boot, or debug lights, then you may have a more serious problem that requires professional help. You may need to contact the manufacturer or the seller of your PC components and request a replacement or a refund. You may also need to consult a local PC repair shop or a friend who is more experienced with PC building. We hope that this article has helped you troubleshoot your newly built PC and solve your issue. If you have any questions or feedback, please leave a comment below. Thank you for reading.

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