How to Trick Your ISP into Giving You Full Speed for All Websites

Question:

How can I bypass ISP throttling that only affects non-Speedtest websites?

I have a problem with my ISP, which seems to throttle the speed of all websites except Speedtest. A while ago, I was able to circumvent this by setting up an OpenVPN server and using www.speedtest.net as the http-proxy Host (SNI), which made all websites appear as Speedtest and get the full speed. However, this trick stopped working recently, and I don’t know what the ISP did to prevent it. Speedtest still shows that I have 70Mbps, but other websites are very slow and sometimes unplayable.

I am looking for a technical solution, as the ISP’s customer service is useless and they are deliberately limiting my speed. I have tried other speed testing websites, but they show much lower speeds than what I am paying for. Changing ISP is not an option, as they are the only real provider in my country. I appreciate any help or suggestions on how to fix this issue. Thank you.

Answer:

If you are frustrated by your ISP’s throttling of your internet speed, you are not alone. Many users have reported that their ISP only allows them to access Speedtest at full speed, while other websites are significantly slower or even unplayable. This is a common practice among ISPs to deceive customers into thinking that they are getting the speed they paid for, while in reality they are limiting their bandwidth for other services.

Fortunately, there are some ways to bypass this unfair throttling and enjoy the internet at its full potential. In this article, we will explain how ISP throttling works, why it affects non-Speedtest websites, and what you can do to overcome it.

How ISP Throttling Works

ISP throttling is the intentional slowing down of your internet speed by your ISP. This can be done for various reasons, such as reducing network congestion, managing traffic, enforcing data caps, or discriminating against certain websites or services. ISP throttling can affect your browsing, streaming, gaming, downloading, and uploading experience, depending on how severe it is.

ISP throttling can be implemented in different ways, such as:

  • Shaping: This is when your ISP limits your speed for certain types of traffic, such as peer-to-peer, video, or VoIP. This can be done by inspecting the packets of data that you send and receive, and applying different rules or priorities to them.
  • Capping: This is when your ISP sets a limit on how much data you can use in a given period, such as a day, a week, or a month. If you exceed this limit, your speed will be reduced until the next cycle. This can be done by monitoring your data usage and applying a throttle when you reach the cap.
  • Blocking: This is when your ISP prevents you from accessing certain websites or services altogether, such as Netflix, YouTube, or Facebook. This can be done by filtering the requests that you make and denying them if they match a blacklist.
  • Why ISP Throttling Affects Non-Speedtest Websites

    One of the most common ways that ISPs throttle your speed is by shaping your traffic based on the type of website or service that you are using. For example, your ISP may allow you to access Speedtest at full speed, because it is a website that measures your internet speed. However, your ISP may slow down your speed for other websites, such as Netflix, YouTube, or Reddit, because they consume more bandwidth and compete with the ISP’s own services.

    This can be done by using a technique called deep packet inspection (DPI), which allows your ISP to analyze the content and destination of the data packets that you send and receive. By using DPI, your ISP can identify the website or service that you are using, and apply different rules or policies to it. For example, your ISP may prioritize Speedtest over Netflix, or block Netflix altogether.

    However, DPI is not a perfect technique, and it can be fooled by using encryption or obfuscation. Encryption is when you scramble the data packets that you send and receive, so that your ISP cannot read them or identify their content or destination. Obfuscation is when you disguise the data packets that you send and receive, so that your ISP cannot recognize them or classify their type. For example, you can make your Netflix traffic look like Speedtest traffic, and trick your ISP into giving you full speed.

    What You Can Do to Bypass ISP Throttling

    There are several methods that you can use to bypass ISP throttling and access non-Speedtest websites at full speed. Some of the most popular ones are:

  • Using a VPN: A VPN, or virtual private network, is a service that creates a secure and encrypted connection between your device and a remote server. By using a VPN, you can hide your IP address, location, and online activity from your ISP, and prevent them from inspecting or shaping your traffic. A VPN also allows you to access geo-restricted or censored websites or services, by changing your virtual location to another country. However, not all VPNs are created equal, and some may be slower, less secure, or more expensive than others. Therefore, you should choose a VPN that is fast, reliable, and trustworthy, and that does not keep logs of your activity or sell your data to third parties.
  • Using a proxy: A proxy, or proxy server, is a service that acts as an intermediary between your device and the internet. By using a proxy, you can change your IP address, location, and online identity, and bypass some of the ISP’s filters or blocks. A proxy also allows you to access geo-restricted or censored websites or services, by routing your traffic through another country. However, a proxy does not encrypt your traffic, and it may be slower, less secure, or more unreliable than a VPN. Therefore, you should use a proxy only for simple or occasional tasks, and not for sensitive or important ones.
  • Using a DNS changer: A DNS, or domain name system, is a service that translates the human-readable names of websites, such as www.speedtest.net, into the numerical IP addresses that computers use, such as 104.16.38.249. By using a DNS changer, you can change the DNS server that your device uses to resolve the names of websites, and bypass some of the ISP’s blocks or redirects. A DNS changer also allows you to access geo-restricted or censored websites or services, by using a DNS server that is located in another country. However, a DNS changer does not encrypt your traffic, and it may not work for all websites or services. Therefore, you should use a DNS changer only as a last resort, and not for secure or critical ones.
  • Conclusion

    ISP

throttling is a common and annoying problem that affects many internet users around the world. It can significantly reduce your internet speed and quality, and prevent you from accessing the websites or services that you want. However, there are some ways to bypass ISP throttling and enjoy the internet at its full potential. By using a VPN, a proxy, or a DNS changer, you can hide or change your online identity, and trick your ISP into giving you full speed for non-Speedtest websites. However, you should be careful and choose the method that suits your needs and preferences, and that does not compromise your security or privacy. We hope that this article has helped you understand how ISP throttling works, why it affects non-Speedtest websites, and what you can do to overcome it. Thank you for reading.

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